Improving Program Ranking Methodologies

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE

Ranking and rating systems for colleges and hospitals are now widely accepted by the public as one indicator of quality, and this is true for graduate healthcare management programs as well. Every few years, US News & World Report(USN&WR) produces a highly anticipated report on what it deems The Best Health Care Management Programs. USN&WR recognizes the importance of accreditation, and limits the list to only CAHME-Accredited programs.

Recognizing the importance that both graduate healthcare management programs–and their prospective students–place on these sorts of rankings, CAHME is interested in ways of enhancing ranking methodologies to improve their consistency and reliability in recognizing program quality. This is consistent with our mission of making information easily available to interested constituencies.

I recently had the opportunity to talk with leaders of the USN&WR team that oversees its ranking projects. USN&WR intends to release its next ranking of graduate healthcare management programs in early 2019, based upon data gathered in 2018. The USN&WR team is committed to constant improvement of their ranking methodologies, and we plan to meet again in January 2018 as they consider the next iteration of their report.

I want to acknowledge the support of Accreditation Council member Dr. Bill Tuttle, Vice President of Planning at Baptist Memorial Healthcare Corporation, who briefed me on the intricacies of the ranking system.  Bill has just completed his dissertation on the USN&WR ranking system. Bill and I talked about how USN&WR could incorporate more quantitative data into the ranking process to improve the accuracy and usefulness of the report, such as the data that CAHME-accredited programs provide in their annual reports.

I am very interested to hear suggestions from CAHME stakeholders that we could share with USN&WR. CAHME is considering forming an advisory committee on this topic, so if you are interested in volunteering, please contact me.

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME

Early Registration for CAHME Accreditation Boot Camp is Now Available

It’s not too soon to reserve your space for the first CAHME Accreditation Boot Camp of 2018, which will be held in conjunction with the ACHE Congress on Healthcare Leadership, on March 25, 2018. Sign up early to enjoy a discount and coordinate with your travel plans for the ACHE Congress.

Kevin Broom, PhD, (standing) leads a discussion at last year’s CAHME Accreditation Boot Camp.

This year’s Boot Camp agenda will focus on how competency-based education aligns with CAHME accreditation criteria. Attending the Boot Camp is the best way for you to strengthen your knowledge and understanding of CAHME accreditation and what it means for your program. This year’s program is revamped, based on attendee input, and will include exclusive web access to pre-Camp materials, and more group work during the Camp.

You will get involved, as instruction is engaging, interactive, and will offer a variety of tools, technical instructions, and hands-on practice. Boot Camp instructors include Daniel Gentry, PhD, MHA, from the Department of Health Management and Policy at the University of Iowa College of Public Health; and Kevin Broom, PhD, Director of MHA and MHA/MBA Programs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health.

Early registration (by December 31, 2017) is $800—a $100 discount off general registration. CAHME Accreditation Boot Camps are popular and space is limited.

Register today to claim your spot.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE

President & CEO
CAHME

CAHME Accredited Programs Dominate NAHSE Case Competition

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE

CAHME-accredited programs dominated the recent case competition sponsored by the National Association of Health Services Executives (NAHSE), held last month in San Antonio, TX. The top three finishers in the 22nd Everett V. Fox Student Case Competition represented CAHME-accredited programs at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Saint Louis University, and Ohio State University.

With a theme of “Creating a Healthy America Together: Serving our Communities,” the case competition asked teams to focus on making Oakland, CA, “The Healthiest City in America.”  The UNC team took first place with a presentation that went beyond traditional boundaries of healthcare to include issues such as how the city can address “food deserts” and improve access to fresh food and produce.

I’ve attended the NAHSE annual conferences for nearly a decade. NAHSE’s focus on mentorship and career growth for African-American healthcare executives and graduate healthcare management students makes it one of the most effective forces for enhancing diversity and cultural competencies in healthcare. This work is vitally important, and is consistent with CAHME’s mission of supporting the development of future healthcare leaders.

CAHME tracks different student case competitions from around the country on our web site, and I encourage you to check out the list of winners and upcoming events. Case competitions are a great way for students to put their classroom learning into effect in the “real world.” It is heartening to see the innovation embodied by winning teams.

Congratulations to everyone at NAHSE and to the student winners of this year’s competition!

 

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME

 

The winning UNC team, from left, Lauren Jordan, Oluoma Chukwu, and Jessica Broadus.
Second place finishers from Saint Louis University, from left, Matthew Glassman, Brianna Clair, and Kwamane Liddell.
Third place finishers from Ohio State University, from left, Gennel Vieria, Esther Olsen, and Wilkister Tangasi.

Why Healthcare Administration is Important

Anthony Stanowski
Gerald L. Glandon, PhD

In a recent NY Times op-ed, Sandeep Jauhar uses the internecine struggles of a small California hospital to suggest that our health system would be improved if more physicians held executive leadership positions at our nation’s hospitals. (Shouldn’t Doctors Control Hospital Care?). Certainly, doctors and nurses should control providing medical services to patients.  These professionals have years of training and experience in making these important decisions.

However, the skills needed to provide administrative leadership for hospitals are significantly different from those needed to provide clinical care. Modern hospital leadership requires excellence in understanding community needs, human resources, accounting, finance, economics, logistics, and government regulation. Without skilled administrators who have mastered these and other elements, physicians would not be able to focus on patients.

This distinction between clinical and administrative leadership is not new. Florence Nightingale implemented administrative processes, financial management, medical records systems, and architectural standards for hospitals beginning in 1854.  Today, most hospitals in the US are not-for-profit institutions, led by the combined expertise of their medical staffs, administrators, and boards of community leaders.  For all the challenges and changes in healthcare over the last 150 years, this model has proven very successful.

Dr. Jauhar might have focused on the many physicians who pursue advanced education in healthcare and business administration. These physicians often do bring a unique and powerful perspective toward the business of healthcare. But suggesting that our health system would be improved if only more doctors were in charge is simply not supported by the facts, and it disparages the many dedicated and talented healthcare administrators who are as committed as any physician to the health of patients and communities.

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE 
President and CEO
CAHME

Gerald L. Glandon, PhD
President and CEO
Association of University Programs in Healthcare Administration

New Case Competition Available for CAHME Students

CAHME is pleased to support a new case competition sponsored by the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS). The first annual HIMSS Student Case Competition encourages interdisciplinary teams of graduate, residents, or Fellows to analyze a HIMSS-supplied case study. From this analysis, teams will apply recommendations supported by current health information technology practices that can transform care, while coupling recommendations with advocacy outreach at the federal and state levels.

Winners will be recognized at HIMSS18, the world’s largest health IT conference, and have the opportunity to showcase their talent, network with thoughts leaders, and gain a competitive edge.

Interested students can learn more and register for the competition on the HIMSS web site. Registration closes on November 20, 2017.

CAHME Awards Program Now Accepting Applications

 

 

 

Once again, CAHME is pleased to announce, with thanks to our corporate partners, our annual Awards competition to recognize programs that advance the quality of graduate healthcare management education.

CAHME-accredited programs have a chance to win in four areas:

To the winning program, each award brings:

  • Up to $5,000 to fund initiatives described in the award application. For example, the CAHME/Canon Award for Sustainability includes a $5,000 grant for a faculty member doing research in sustainability in healthcare.
  • Recognition of award recipient programs in a full-page ad in Modern Healthcare.
  • Presentation of the award at the CAHME Awards Ceremony during the 2018 ACHE Congress.
  • One night hotel accommodation and round trip coach airfare to Chicago for the Award Ceremony for one Program representative.

Only CAHME accredited programs are eligible to participate. The deadline for applications is Wednesday, November 22, 2017. For full details, please visit www.cahme.org.

For questions, please contact Joe Morris, Program Specialist at CAHME at jmorris@cahme.org.

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME
astanowski@cahme.org

Remembering Tim Campbell

Tim Campbell: “Do something nice for someone.”

I first met Tim Campbell at Aramark in 2008.  When I started at the company, I decided to get in early, and head to the company gym. A gentleman was working out next to me, and we exchanged greetings.  I got to know Tim over time, learned that he was a former University of Georgia football player from their championship years, a former Navy Seal, and mostly…one of the nicest people you could meet.

Tim headed up Aramark’s correctional business, and he later transferred to the larger division of Aramark Healthcare.  The first week of his new job, he pulled me into his office and asked me to explain how hospitals were paid.  I asked for a day to prepare some materials, and the next day I sat in the corner office and explained to Tim the US healthcare payer system.  “That’s just about the dumbest thing I ever heard,” Tim laughed.  Much later, Tim and I got to discuss the Affordable Care Act and its implications for Aramark, the Aramark fellowship program, and the impact of presidential elections on business.   His mind was geared toward solving problems; he was a masters-trained engineer.  Yet, his soul was musical, and he loved to talk about his family.

Tim left Aramark, and joined Secur America, a security company.  We stayed in touch.  He loved education, and when I was on the CAHME board, a slot opened for a public member, which Tim filled in 2012. That next year, Tim left Corporate America, and became a small business owner. He purchased a Big Frog Custom T-shirt franchise, and ran a consulting firm specializing in executive coaching.  He wanted to be closer to his family, stop getting on planes, and work within a community.

Tim brought discipline to CAHME’s operations as a board member, and pushed for defining our value proposition.  We both shared a passion for CAHME, and when Margaret Schulte retired as CAHME’s CEO, Tim encouraged me to apply.   I was concerned; going to a small non-profit and leaving the “business” end of healthcare was not something I thought I wanted.   It was Tim who pointed out to me that CAHME was what I was passionate about, and that there are more important things in this world than the corporate ladder.  “You can make a difference,” he said to me.

At our May 2017 CAHME Board meeting, Tim arrived late in the evening the day before the meeting.  I called and suggested we go to the bar (as we typically did), get a drink, have some laughs and catch up.  He said he was tired, had bronchitis, and promised to get breakfast the next morning.  “That was different,” I thought.  At the board meeting, Tim’s weight loss was evident.  He talked about his medical issues, but said he was feeling better.

In June, Tim called me with the news that he had pancreatic cancer. He said he did not have long to live.  He told me that he didn’t want a funeral, didn’t want people to just open their check books and be done with it.  He told me one important thing, and asked me to tell other people about it: just do good for people.  “Do something nice for someone,” he said.   “I don’t want my death to be just about writing a check.”

Over the past 15 months at CAHME, Tim provided advice and support to me. This includes a phone call just last week when we discussed materials for the board meeting and membership meeting. At the call’s conclusion, I told Tim that I loved him, and he returned it. We both choked back some tears and said we would catch up.

CAHME is a better organization because of Tim, and, I must say, I am a better person because of him. The world has lost a humble man and a friend to many. We lost a man who made a difference in his community and his country. We lost a bona fide hero. Tim’s death reminds us to hug loved ones a little tighter today, and to remember the key to a successful life: just do something nice for someone.

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME
astanowski@cahme.org

Dawn Gideon Foundation Supports CAHME Best Practices Education

I want to bring special attention to the Dawn Gideon Foundation and its support for CAHME’s fall webinar series on Competency Attainment. Because of the Foundation’s generosity, we can provide the webinars at no cost.

Dawn Gideon graduated from the CAHME-accredited University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health in the early 1980s and began a career in healthcare leadership that was remarkable in its scope and impact. She joined the Forbes Health System, and within seven years was named its CEO. She was a leader of Forbes’ merger with Allegheny University Hospitals. After leaving Allegheny, Dawn started a private consulting practice, later acquired by Huron Consulting, that focused on helping healthcare systems across the country find creative avenues to success.

The Dawn Gideon Foundation was founded after Dawn’s death from cancer in 2015. The Foundation provides resources to train and empower professionals, especially women, to succeed in healthcare careers and to become role models for compassionate and intelligent leadership. The Foundation focuses on supporting education; forums for discussion and the sharing of ideas; and funding research opportunities on healthcare leadership and management. The Foundation’s long-term goal is to be recognized as a thought leader in the healthcare industry while providing opportunities for the advancement of women.

The Dawn Gideon Foundation and CAHME are both devoted to developing future leaders in healthcare. The Foundation’s support of our webinar series puts that goal into action, and we are deeply grateful.

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME
astanowski@cahme.org

Benefits for CAHME Students and Programs Mark the New Semester

As the new school years gets underway at 98 CAHME-accredited programs in the United States and Canada, I am pleased to announce some new complimentary benefits and the start of a new season for the Awards program. Look for future updates for more details and how to sign up. I want to thank the CAHME corporate members and  sponsors who make these possible.

Complimentary Benefits from AHA Personal Membership Groups: The American Hospital Association (AHA) and CAHME have partnered to provide students from CAHME-accredited programs with complimentary access to networking, emerging news, and resources to support students’ healthcare management education coursework. Students will find that participating in an AHA Professional Membership Group (PMG) provides a competitive edge in advancing their careers. Membership includes access to the coveted AHA Future Scan report that identifies important trends in healthcare.

Complimentary Subscription to Modern Healthcare Magazine and Modern Healthcare Online: Students in CAHME-accredited programs can get a free subscription to  the digital edition of Modern Healthcare, a leading source of information and research about business and policy trends in healthcare.

A Complimentary Fall Webinar Series on How to Succeed with Competency Assessment Criteria in Accreditation will kick off on September 20. The webinar will feature several CAHME programs that are succeeding in monitoring and measuring students attainment of competencies necessary to lead healthcare organizations.  Through site visits, CAHME examined our programs’ performance and found that many programs struggle with how to evaluate students in attainment of competencies, and how to communicate that information to students. Of the 62 programs reviewed using the 2013 Criteria for Accreditation, only 16 programs measured competency attainment completely and successfully. However, several programs created processes for excelling in those areas.  In keeping with CAHME’s mission, four (4) programs that excelled in this area will be featured in a webinar series in the Fall of 2017.  Go to www.cahme.org for more information.

The CAHME Awards Program: Partnering with leading corporations in healthcare, CAHME is pleased to once again offer students the chance to apply for a number of prestigious awards that support students in a range of special areas. You can read more about available awards on the CAHME web site. We are grateful to our partners Cerner, Ascension, Baylor Scott & White, and Canon for their commitment to excellence in healthcare management education.

Look for future updates from CAHME about each of these special benefits and programs and how our programs and students can take advantage. They are an added value for CAHME programs and the students served.

Best wishes for a successful academic year!

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME
astanowski@cahme.org

Integrating Healthcare Management Education with Other Disciplines

One of the unique challenges and opportunities of healthcare management lies in the field’s broad application to a wide range of sectors. Successful leadership in the field means understanding all the ways in which healthcare integrates across disciplines, and how those disciplines can influence the health of individuals and communities.

The University of Iowa takes a robust approach toward encouraging interdisciplinary education for its MHA students. I had the pleasure of visiting Iowa this past spring. Formal joint degree options are offered, including programs combining the MHA curriculum with studies in business, law, medicine, pharmacy, urban planning, public health, health policy, and occupational health. Some MHA students may choose to complete a two-semester Interdisciplinary Program for Graduate Studies in Aging and Longevity. Iowa will soon offer the MHA in combination with a masters in finance or business analytics. All of Iowa’s MHA students take three semesters of inter-professional  education with graduate students from every health profession on campus. The University also emphasizes experiential learning—a hallmark of CAHME-accredited programs.

My guide to understanding the University of Iowa’s approach was Dan Gentry, PhD, MHA, director of the University’s MHA program. During our visit, Dan shared the program’s conviction “that today’s healthcare leader needs both a comprehensive understanding of the issues involved in patient-centered service organizations and strong business skills.” Dan’s commitment to this belief is also expressed through his service on the CAHME Accreditation Council. He is also a former CAHME board member.

As the University of Iowa and other CAHME-accredited programs across the country gear up for a new academic year, I am excited to think about the opportunities awaiting the students who will be our future leaders in healthcare.

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME
astanowski@camhe.org