In Praise of Great Teachers

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE

What follows are remarks I wrote to mark the retirement for Michael D. Rosko, PhD, a professor of Healthcare Management at Widener University. I had the honor of being one of Mike’s students. I share these comments not only to honor Mike, but to honor all those teachers in CAHME-accredited programs who fulfill so honorably their awesome responsibility of shaping the future leaders of healthcare.

Talking about an icon like Mike Rosko could easily include the number of students he taught, the number of papers he published, or the honors attained.   Mike is an economist, so numbers are important. As a teacher, however, Mike is far more than numbers.

To me, a teacher is someone who pulls out something inside of you that you didn’t even know existed.  Someone who alters your perspective to see things that you didn’t know were there. Someone who makes you not a replica of themselves, but into a better a better version of yourself.

I remember being at Widener sometime in my 20s and thinking about who I considered my favorite teachers.  There was my fourth-grade teacher, Miss Valenti, who made learning fun. There was Father Rodia in high school, teaching a course on Christian morality that helped me understand that actions had consequences not just to others, but to myself. As a college undergrad, Ray Birdwhistle opened my mind to how communication serves not just to convey ideas but also as a form of social interaction.

And then there was Mike Rosko.

Mike’s lessons in economics revealed the true nature of healthcare.  Healthcare is not just supply and demand, elasticity of demand, logarithmic curves, and scenario

Michael D. Rosko, PhD: professor, teacher, friend.

analysis.  Mike made healthcare real and enabled his students to understand the humanity behind the numbers.

Let me give you one example.  Back in the 1980s, Widener’s healthcare management program brought in a computer simulation exercise that allowed us students to made decisions as if we were hospital administrators.  We had to market, attract key populations, set our charges, adjust our costs, and manage our resources as a hospital administrator.  Well, being a pretty “smart” guy, I figured out how my hospital could make a lot of money.  I raised charges, stopped taking Medicaid, decreased staffing costs, and dropped costly service lines.  At the end of the exercise, my hospital made the most money. 

Mike gave me an F. What? I made the most money in the class! I won, right? 

Mike looked at me with gentle disdain. This is healthcare. It’s not just about making money. It’s about caring for people.  Being a just person, Mike allowed me to re-work my project, and I brought my F up to a C+. More important that the grade, I learned the lesson. 

The world needs more teachers like Mike Rosko, someone who reminds future (and current) leaders that healthcare is not all about making money.  It is about our humanity.  It is about morality.  It is about making a difference.

 

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME

Building a Legacy for Future Healthcare Leaders

One of the great pleasures of leading CAHME is the opportunity to meet students and faculty in CAHME-accredited programs who are bringing tremendous energy and enthusiasm to advancing healthcare management.

I recently visited such a group at Baruch College Zicklin School of Business, C.U.N.Y. The Zicklin School’s healthcare MBA is one of CAHME’s longest accredited programs, dating from 1971. The program is highly competitive, and I’ve been impressed with the students’ performance in case competitions.

After my visit, I had the pleasure to connect with Jonathan M. Metsch, Dr.PH., a Zicklin Adjunct Professor. Jonathan’s Zicklin role is a return engagement; he served on the fulltime faculty as an Assistant Professor from 1972 – 1975.

Jonathan is a remarkable fellow: after serving in the Air Force in the late 1960s, he went on to a long, varied, and accomplished career in healthcare administration in New York City and northern New Jersey. In addition to his professional positions, Jonathan volunteered for and lead multiple boards, advisory groups, and task forces, including serving as chair of the board of the NJ Hospital Association. As president and CEO of the Jersey City Medical Center, Jonathan oversaw the building of an entirely new hospital that not only enhanced care in that community, but from which visitors, patients, and staff can look out at the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor.

Jonathan M. Metsch, Dr.PH.

Now, after five decades in healthcare, Jonathan is focusing on his legacy. His teaching at Zicklin is just one way in which Jonathan is passing his extensive knowledge and experience on to those coming after him. He also authors a blog titled Doctor, Did You Wash Your Hands(TM)  where he shares his views on healthcare policy as both a practitioner and an academician. Jonathan’s goal is to position his blog as a resource for healthcare management students today and in the future. CAHME accredited program faculty are welcome to use the site for instructional content. If faculty want to contact Jonathan, he can be reached at jonathanmetsch@gmail.com.

The passion, commitment, and dedication to service that came through in my conversation with Jonathan typifies an attitude I see in many CAHME program faculty members, many of whom come to teaching after years in professional practice, and who see their work in CAHME-accredited programs as a way to give back and build a legacy. The students at Zicklin have clearly benefited in learning from Jonathan Metsch and his colleagues at Baruch. It speaks well of the program and the development of future healthcare leaders.

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME
astanowski@cahme.org

Anthony Stanowski (second from right, rear) visited with healthcare MBA students and faculty at the Baruch College Zicklin School of Business, C.U.N.Y., in July.

Anthony Stanowski Bio


Anthony Stanowski
Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE

President and CEO

CAHME

Dr. Anthony Stanowski is the President and CEO for the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education, known as CAHME. In this role, he is responsible for all aspects of strategic and operational leadership of the CAHME.

Prior to joining CAHME, Anthony held executive/management roles at Fortune 200 companies (Aramark, Thomson Reuters Healthcare Division now DBA as IBM Watson Healthcare), small innovative entrepreneurial organizations (Applied Medical Software), and Philadelphia area providers Jefferson Health System, Main Line Health, and Graduate Health.

Anthony is a frequent conference presenter and author. In 2015, Anthony co-authored the book, We Have A Match: My Journey through America’s Transplant System, which details the challenges of providing a positive patient experience in the transplant system.

He served on several boards. He is the chair of the board Quality Committee at Bon Secours Baltimore Health System. He served on the American Hospital’s Association Committee on Governance, as a President of the Healthcare Planning and Marketing Society of New Jersey, and was the inaugural president of the Widener University Healthcare Management Alumni Association.

Anthony received his doctorate degree from the Medical University of South Carolina, where his doctoral thesis focused on the relationship between patient experience and costs. He holds graduate degrees from Drexel (Marketing) and Widener (Health Care Administration) Universities, and a bachelor’s from the University of Pennsylvania (Communications and Psychology). He is Board Certified in healthcare management as a Fellow in the American College of Healthcare Executives.

Eric Brichto

Eric Brichto, JD
Bio

Eric Brichto is the Vice President of Accreditation Operations and Counsel for the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education, known as CAHME. In this role, he is responsible for administration of CAHME’s accreditation activities.

He joined CAHME in January 2013 as a Manager of Operations. In this role he was responsible for managing the Candidacy Committee and Standards Council. He was promoted to Director & Counsel in September 2014 with responsibilities for the Accreditation Council, eAccreditation, and Annual Reporting.

Prior to joining CAHME, Eric worked for the Social Security Administration assisting SSA attorneys in the prosecution of social security fraud.

He is active in the Association of Specialized and Professional Accreditors (ASPA) where he serves on the Good Practice Task Force. He is also a member of the NCAF Benchmarks & Metrics Subcommittee.

Eric received his Juris Doctorate from the University of Baltimore School of Law and his bachelor’s from The George Washington University (English). He a member of the American College of Healthcare Executives.

Brenda Jones

Brenda F. Jones
Manager of Operations

Brenda Jones is the Manager of Operations for the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education, known as CAHME.  In this role, she is responsible for all aspects of business operations and meeting logistics within CAHME.

Prior to joining CAHME, Brenda held an Executive Assistant role at a non-profit organization in the District of Columbia for several years working with mental health clients through a federal government program and as a liaison with St. Elizabeth’s Hospital in organizing appointments, programs and medications. Brenda also worked as a Litigation Legal Secretary for several attorneys over the years.  Her most exciting assignments was at the Dept. of State traveling abroad for eight years as an Executive Assistant to the US Ambassadors for Canada, Switzerland, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Brazil, The Bahamas, Ecuador, Puerto Rico and all the U.S. Virgin Islands to name a few.

As an entrepreneur, Brenda have participated in various motivational speaking sessions with Legal Shield and Market America. She has over 20 years teaching voluntarily throughout the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia areas, and have assisted in a drama production. Brenda enjoys traveling, entertaining, cooking and dancing.