CAHME’s Global Perspectives Expanding

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE

“Think Globally, Act Locally” a familiar bumper sticker reads. CAHME, however, is both thinking and acting globally as part of our strategic focus on creating global accreditation standards for healthcare management education. We established a Global Advisory Council in late 2017 to begin the work of organizing a process for global accreditation as a “backbone” of professionalism in healthcare management. We are leveraging the relationships faculty from CAHME-accredited programs already have with universities around the globe.

Interest in accreditation for programs across the world is accelerating. In addition to CAHME’s ongoing work with programs in Nairobi, Kenya, and Tblisi, Georgia, we have had discussions with programs in Thailand, India, Brazil, Dubai, Saudi Arabia, the Slovak Republic, and Grenada. 

This summer, the World Hospitals and Health Services Journal will publish an article co-authored by myself, Daniel J. West, PhD, FACHE, of the University of ScrantonBernardo Ramirez, MD, MBA, of the University of Central Florida; and Robert Hernandez, PhD, of the University of Alabama at Birmingham exploring how CAHME’s emphasis on competencies can be adopted by programs internationally. The benefits to these international programs are the same as have been seen by CAHME-accredited programs in the US and Canada for the past 50 years: to validate educational quality, to assure the relevance of management education to the healthcare profession, to help students choose a program with confidence in its content and standards, and to provide a framework for continuous improvement in the industry. I will share the article with you upon its publication. (CAHME-accredited programs can also subscribe to the journal at a special discounted price of just $150 a year. Email journal@ihf-fih.org to learn more.) 

These same themes are highlighted in the next episode of CAHME’s Getting to 100 video series. Episode 7: Global Perspective features Sherril Gelmon, MHSc, DrPH of Portland State University and Dan West who were interviewed during CAHME’s 50th  anniversary celebration last year.

The creation of global networks among universities is not new and is reflected in such long-standing practices such as health management partnerships, study-abroad programs, or Fulbright and Rhodes Scholarships. CAHME seeks to leverage the relationships of faculty from accredited programs who want to help expand global accreditation through the CAHME Mentorship Circle (contact me if you are interested!).

The International Hospital Federation has endorsed the concept of global accreditation. IHF recognizes that more countries are becoming “players” on the global higher education stage, and that CAHME’s strategy for accrediting programs globally can advance the professional management necessary to lead increasingly complex healthcare systems. This is a difficult, but necessary, challenge, and I believe CAHME, IHF, and our partners can leverage best management practices world-wide, question established behaviors, and create a generation of leaders with the skills, knowledge, ethics, and commitment to become professionals seeking to ensure the health of communities across the globe.

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME

Understanding Technology’s Impact on Students, Programs, and Healthcare

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE

It’s hard to imagine healthcare without technology. From the first X-ray machines that made medical imaging possible just over one hundred years, virtually every facet of healthcare today has been improved by technologies that diagnose, treat, and manage disease and injury. And the same is true for modern healthcare management: it simply would not be possible without a wide range of technological advances such as data management and digital communications.

Nor has healthcare management education been immune from technology’s impact. As just one example, online instruction has ballooned in recent years and CAHME has established accreditation standards and criteria to ensure that this “virtual” educational experience is as rigorous and effective as traditional face-to-face learning. Additionally, the next generation of healthcare leaders—now in undergraduate or graduate training, or in the early stages of their careers—have a very different relationship with technology than Gen X or Baby Boomer leaders. These latter two demographic groups had to “adopt” technologies that Millennials and younger have grown up with. That has important implications for the work force. For example, some experts have suggested the younger generation is more comfortable interacting online rather than in person. What does that mean for your next planning retreat?

These are the sorts of issues addressed in the latest CAHME video in our Getting to 100 series. Episode Six focuses on the impact of technology, and features the insights of Karen Wager, DBA, professor and associate dean for Student Affairs at the Medical University of South Carolina, and Carla Smith, FHIMSS, who recently retired from her role as executive vice president for the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society.  Leading programs will need to adapt to this changing technological environment and its impact on student expectations and behaviors. Recently, the US Department of Education has started revising standards to encourage accreditors and universities to be more innovative and responsive to a technologically changing workforce.

CAHME is watching these developments closely and will work with academia and leading practitioners to refine our standards and practices to ensure, just as we have for more than 50 years, that we continue to advance the quality of healthcare management education.

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME

CAHME White Paper, Training Help Programs With Benchmarking

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE

Does your program benchmark? Benchmarking provides an external standard against which to measure your program’s own outcomes and can often identify ways to improve performance. As a practice that started in the corporate world in the 1980s, benchmarking is now widely accepted as a powerful management tool across a wide range of industry sectors—including higher education.

CAHME is working to support programs that want to pursue benchmarking. We recently published, with the support of Peregrine Academics, a white paper entitled Benchmarking for Graduate Healthcare Management Education Programs: Perspectives from the Field. The white paper is available for free on our website. It explores current trends in benchmarking and profiles four CAHME-accredited programs using benchmarking to drive performance improvement. I strongly encourage you to read the white paper to learn more.

In addition to this new white paper, CAHME offers “enhanced benchmarking” as a free resource to our accredited programs.  Enhanced benchmarking is intended to help programs pursue their goals for continuous quality improvement. Our benchmarking data includes site visit report information (including self-study) and program annual report data.

During the AUPHA annual meeting in June, CAHME will host a Benchmarking Breakfast as part of our Boot Camp. During the breakfast you can learn more about how your program can take part in CAHME’s enhanced benchmarking initiative. Our goal is to have 80 percent of accredited programs signed up for enhanced benchmarking by June 30. You can register and learn more on our web site.

Benchmarking supports CAHME’s mission to advance the quality of healthcare management education. We believe benchmarking can encourage common advancement across the industry. Programs that perform well can contribute to the common advancement of graduate programs overall.  CAHME’s goal is to not just make one program better, but to make every program better.

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME