CAHME-Accredited Programs Represent “Beauty and Strength” of Diversity

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE

CAHME programs produce an annual report to demonstrate how they fulfill their mission and meet the requirements of accreditation. This information is required by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation and has the added advantage of enabling programs to benchmark their progress.

These annual reports provide a fascinating insight into many aspects of CAHME-accredited programs. As just one example, programs provide data on the diversity of their student body. CAHME’s accreditation Criteria IIA2 states that programs “will have recruiting practices and well-defined admission criteria designed to recruit and admit qualified students and to pursue a diverse student population as reflected in the Program’s mission-defined market.” For the 2017/18 academic year, CAHME programs reported the following ethnic breakdown of students: White or Caucasian: 58.9%; Asian: 17.6%; Black or African-American: 12.6%; Hispanic: 9.9%; Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander: 0.7%; Native American: 0.3%.

The chart below illustrates racial and ethnic diversity percentages for most CAHME programs. The overall average is 41 percent.

Figure 1: CAHME Accredited Programs, 2017 – 2018, Percent Enrolled Students from Racial/Ethnic Minorities by Reporting Program. (Excludes programs from Canada and Puerto Rico. Ten programs did not report. Overall percentage based on total enrollment for all programs.)

Diversity in developing the next generation of healthcare leaders is not just a crucial issue but, to paraphrase the writer Maya Angelou, represents both “beauty and strength.” Diverse healthcare leadership produces more innovative ideas and emphasizes inclusion in decision-making. Equally important, it helps ensure that future healthcare leadership reflects the increasing diversity of American society. This feature of leadership will be increasingly important, especially as health systems tackle cultural competence and issues around the social determinants of health. 

“You can’t manage what you don’t measure” is a familiar aphorism in the business world. By asking programs to report on the diversity of their enrollment, CAHME’s accreditation requirements acknowledge the important impact of diversity and its contribution to increasing the pool of diverse healthcare leaders and advancing the quality of healthcare management education. 

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME

CAHME Marks Newly Accredited and Re-accredited Programs

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE

At our May Board meeting, CAHME approved accreditation for a new program: the University of Louisville School of Public Health & Information Sciences Master of Science in Health Administration. With its addition, a total of 106 programs in the US and Canada now meet CAHME standards—an all-time high.

The Board also re-accredited five programs:

Accreditation is at the core of CAHME’s mission to advance the quality of healthcare education. Achieving accreditation, or re-accreditation, is the culmination of significant effort by programs to demonstrate that they meet CAHME standards. And those standards are important. Students look for CAHME-accredited programs as assurance that they will offer a high-quality educational experience that will best prepare them for leadership. Hospitals and health systems look to hire graduates of CAHME-accredited programs knowing that these new executives are coming to them not just with academic credentials, but with proven competencies in meeting the challenges of providing healthcare in communities across the country and around the world. CAHME maintains a searchable database of accredited programs on our web site which includes program information, accreditation history, contact info, and links to program webs sites.

I want to acknowledge, too, the many volunteers for CAHME who provide such important support as conducting site visits, reviewing applications, and serving on a range of committees that advance the quality of healthcare management education.

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME

Webinar Explores Accreditation for Online Programs

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE

A CAHME webinar last week explored an area of growing interest and importance, as institutions of higher education pursue innovation through internet-based learning. Based on analysis of IPEDS data for master’s degrees in health management, the HSM Leadership Center at Rush University found that, between 2013 and 2017, distance learning graduates increased by 119 percent, while traditional degree graduates increased by 9 percent. More than one third of all master’s in healthcare management graduates are now from online programs.

This trend surely will continue as universities look to expand opportunities for students and professionals seeking to advance in healthcare administration careers. CAHME began offering accreditation to fully online programs in 2015 and since then has accredited several online programs.

Recognizing that the technology for online learning continues to advance, in May 2018 the CAHME Board removed the requirement for 120 hours of synchronous (live) instructor/student engagement.  After rigorous research involving program directors, students, and practitioners, the Board determined that the achievement of competencies (outcomes) is the critical factor for accreditation. The Board reinforced CAHME’s mission and seeks to ensure that accreditation for online programs is as rigorous as accreditation for traditional residential programs.

Pursuing CAHME Accreditation for an Online Program: Lessons from the Field explored how programs can meet CAHME criteria and standards. Held in cooperation with the AUPHA Online Program Directors Forum, the one-hour webinar featured a panel presentation and Q&A with seasoned program directors of three CAHME accredited online programs.

The panelists included Anne Hewitt, PhD, MHA, Program Director and Associate Professor from Seton Hall University; Dawn Oetjen, PhD, Associate Dean, Administration and Faculty Affairs at University of Central Florida; and Steven Szydlowski, DHA, Professor Graduate Health Administration Program Director from the University of Scranton. Moderators included Forum chair Carla Stebbins, PhD, of the Rochester Institute of Technology, and Chair-elect Eric Richardson, PhD, of the University of North Carolina Wilmington.

If you missed the webinar, you can hear the presentations and see the slides on our web site. We appreciate our colleagues at the AUPHA Online Program Directors Forum for their support in providing this information to CAHME-accredited programs.

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME

CAHME to Certify Quality and Safety Programs

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE

I am very pleased to share news that at its November meeting, the CAHME Board of Directors approved certification standards for graduate programs in healthcare quality and safety. This partnership with nine leading universities offering masters degrees in quality and safety established important standards and competencies for ensuring quality education for healthcare safety and quality leadership. It is the first step toward the eventual creation of more robust accreditation standards.

The need is clear. Healthcare quality and safety (HQS) has experienced dramatic growth, both in terms of being a focus of health systems and in the number of graduate programs, over the last decade. Ten years ago, there were just two graduate programs focusing on HQS. Today there are 13 in the United States and Canada. Program directors began discussing the establishment of certification and accreditation in 2017, and have involved practitioners and associations in this process.

This is a natural extension of CAHME’s expertise and experience, and we are thrilled to be part of the effort. As individual graduate programs have developed their own HQS programs, there has been a lack of consistency and agreement on what should be included in curricula, student experiences, or the competencies that should be mastered. I commend the programs for voluntarily coming together to work through these issues that will, ultimately, help to drive improvement in graduate HQS education.

On the CAHME web site you can view a brief video featuring David Nash, MD, founding dean of the Jefferson College of Population Health, and Stephanie Mercado, president of the National Association of Healthcare Quality, discussing how CAHME’s process for accreditation will come into play in the development of standards for graduate programs in HQS. The video was filmed at the General Session of the NAHQ Annual Meeting in November.

We will have updates on this exciting initiative in the months ahead.

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME

CAHME Standards Refinement

View the webinar recording » Download webinar slides »

At its meeting on June 1, 2018, the CAHME Board of Directors approved refinement of three accreditation standards for CAHME programs. These changes are summarized below, and we encourage any interested program personnel to take part in a special free webinar on July 24, 2018 at 12 noon Eastern Time to learn more.

These refinements will maintain the quality and integrity of CAHME-accreditation while also easing administrative burdens on programs and ensure that CAHME continues to adapt to the changing needs of students and programs.

These changes are effective immediately, and are summarized below:

Requirement E: 120-hours of synchronous education for accreditation has been removed.This change allows programs more flexibility in reaching students with unique needs, such as those in active military duty, those in other time zones or countries, and working students. It also shifts the focus of the standard from requiring a certain number of hours (process) toward development of critical competencies (outcomes). This is consistent with other accreditors. Finally, it allows programs that do not have 120-hours of synchronous learning to at least enter the CAHME review process, to determine how to strengthen their curriculum.  This fits in our mission of advancing the quality of graduate healthcare management education.

III C 2:  The Program will regularly evaluate the extent to which each student attains the competencies at the level targeted by the Program, and will have a process in place for communicating that information to students was changed. Programs no longer have to measure student level competency attainment at the course level.This change recognizes the fact that 77 percent of programs in the past six years have not met the standard, while the failure rate of the next highest criteria is just one-third as high. We heard from programs, too, that the data to support this standard is expensive and resource intensive to acquire. We noticed additional difficulties for MBA and MPH programs where faculty are not under control of a single program director.

A.5 The Program will ensure that graduates’ career preparedness is monitored, documented and used for continuous improvement. We have added clarifying language to this standard: “Graduate career tracking can be accomplished in multiple ways, e.g., annual surveys, periodic surveys (at least every three years), comprehensive use of an alumni directory of program graduates, active tracking via LinkedIn, robust alumni engagement in advisory board activity, etc. The primary intent of this criterion is to ensure the Program remains engaged with and actively monitors alumni to ensure graduates meet industry expectations and can secure and retain employment.”

We believe this additional language will eliminate confusion about how programs should try to meet this standard, and will improve inter-rater reliability on program evaluations.

These refinements are consistent with CAHME’s long-standing practice of reviewing our standards and modifying them as needed to ensure their relevance and effectiveness not only for accredited programs, but for the students pursing advanced education in healthcare management.

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME

First CAHME Mentorship Circle Recipients Announced

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE

I am pleased to announce the first set of programs to achieve membership in the CAHME Mentorship Circle. In establishing the CAHME Mentorship Circle designation, the CAHME Board seeks to recognize those programs that—in addition to achieving the high standards of CAHME accreditation themselves—engage in a variety of activities that help to extend CAHME’s mission of advancing the quality of graduate healthcare management education. CHAME Mentorship Circle status recognizes that these programs provide opportunities to other students and other programs to advance their own experiences and skills—for the good of the entire healthcare field.

Here is the list of our first group of CAHME Mentorship Circle programs:

  • University of Alabama at Birmingham Master of Science in Health Administration
  • Baylor University Healthcare MBA Program
  • University of Central Florida Master of Health Administration
  • Cornell University Sloan Program in Health Administration
  • University of Iowa Master of Healthcare Administration
  • University of Kentucky Master of Health Administration
  • University of Minnesota Master of Healthcare Administration
  • University of Missouri Master of Health Administration
  • University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill Master of Healthcare Administration
  • The Ohio State University Master of Health Administration
  • Rush University Master of Sciences in Health Systems Management
  • Saint Louis University Master of Health Administration
  • University of Scranton Master of Health Administration
  • Seton Hall University Master of Healthcare Administration

On our web site you can read what each program is doing to garner this special recognition, along with application forms, information about the application process, and a video explaining the CAHME Mentorship Circle goals and criteria. Going forward, we will consider CAHME Mentorship Circle applications twice each year: September 1 and February 1.

CAHME Mentorship Circle status is an honor and a responsibility. It requires extra effort by programs, but rewards that extra effort by providing these programs with additional recognition that speaks to their dedication to the field of healthcare management education.

My congratulations and thanks to these special programs for achieving CAHME Mentorship Circle status.

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME

Congratulations to Accredited Programs

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE

 

The core of CAHME’s mission is the accreditation process. Whether achieving a first-time accreditation, or renewing one, programs undergo a thorough review of their curriculum, administration, faculty, and services for students to ensure that these programs meet objective standards for quality and innovation. The accreditation process is strenuous, and it should be: achieving accreditation sends a message to prospective students and employers that these programs are successfully meeting the many challenges of preparing future leaders in healthcare management.

 

 

CAHME is pleased to recognize the following programs for achieving:

Re-accreditation
Georgetown University
MHSA Program (Executive and Residential)
Washington, DC

Widener University
MBA in Healthcare Management (MBA/HCM)
Chester, PA

Initial Accreditation
University of Nevada, Las Vegas
MHA Program
Las Vegas, NV

The George Washington University
Executive MHA Program
Washington, DC

All four programs underwent site visits and documentation review last fall, and their status was approved by the CAHME board at its meeting last week. We are grateful as well for our volunteer professionals who conduct site visits and review accreditation submissions. Their contributions are vital to the accreditation process.

Congratulations to each of these programs. Their achieving and maintaining CAHME-accreditation is one foundation of their commitment to students and to the future of healthcare management education.

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME

Benchmarking and Mentorship Encourage Quality Improvement; New Scholarships Announced

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE

CAHME is pleased to announce three new initiatives underway this Spring: The CAHME Mentorship Circle (CMC), Enhanced Benchmarking, and, to comply with CHEA standards, the addition of program data available on the CAHME website.

The CAHME Mentorship Circle (CMC) designation will recognize CAHME accredited programs that demonstrate a commitment to excellence not only to their own programs, but across the broader field of graduate healthcare management education. CMC-designated programs will engage in mentorship, best practice dissemination, and other activities that support CAHME’s mission to advance the quality of graduate healthcare management education. The deadline for initial applications is April 16, 2018, and a second application deadline is scheduled for September 1, 2018.

CAHME Enhanced Benchmarking is intended to be a resource for programs pursuing continuous quality improvement. Enhanced Benchmarking includes two distinct aspects: the ability to access and compare limited site visit report information (which includes self-study information), and the ability to access and compare annual report data.  This capability enables CAHME -accredited programs that share their data to review data from other programs that also share their data. Participation in Enhanced Benchmarking is one of the requirements for achieving Mentorship Circle designation.  Programs should sign up to activate this capability offered through the eAccreditation system; training on the tool will be scheduled in late May.

Program data on the CAHME website: To comply with new standards required by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (which provides formal recognition to CAHME as an accrediting body), CAHME’s board asked management to make additional program statistics available on our web site. These will provide potential students with data about applications, enrollment, curriculum, job placement, and other metrics. CAHME will use the annual report data and a summary of the accreditation site visit to populate the report.  Programs have until April 20, 2018 to submit changes to CAHME;  the data will go live on May 4, 2018.

More information, including the content from a recent webinar, is available on the CAHME web site. I encourage you to learn more about these three important initiatives.

I also want to draw your attention to two scholarship programs that honor remarkable leaders in business and healthcare. Nominations are now being accepted for the CAHME – Tim Campbell Scholarship, which supports students who reflect Tim Campbell’s commitment to service and volunteerism. The CAHME – Dawn Gideon Foundation Scholarship honors Dawn Gideon and her commitment to supporting women in healthcare management. We encourage programs to nominate deserving students for these two scholarships.

President & CEO
CAHME

CAHME at 50: What’s Ahead for our Next Fifty Years?

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE

This year marks the 50th anniversary for the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education—a remarkable achievement that we’ve attained because of visionary leaders in the past and the dedication of CAHME’s academic, healthcare, and corporate partners who believe in the value of healthcare management education and what it contributes to the health of our nation.

This summer, CAHME will celebrate this milestone with a special 50th anniversary celebration and panel discussion to be held on Tuesday, June 12 at the Loews Hotel in Philadelphia. Our panel discussion will bring together industry leaders and experts to explore the question: What three steps must CAHME, its accredited programs, and the profession take to ensure another 50 years of advancing the quality of healthcare management education?

Our panelists will include:

  • Virginia Calega, MD, vice president for medical management and policy, Independence Blue Cross;
  • Joe Gasque, chief marketing officer, US & Canada, GE Healthcare;
  • Gerald Glandon, PhD, president & CEO of the Association of University Programs in Health Administration;
  • Carla Smith, FHIMSS, executive vice president of the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society;
  • Rulon Stacey, PhD, FACHE, managing director of Navigant; and
  • Christine C. Winn, FACHE, senior vice president of the MD Anderson Cooper Cancer Institute

I am also very grateful for the support of:

Because of their generosity, this event is FREE and open to all attendees of the AUPHA Annual Meeting in Philadelphia and healthcare executives and healthcare management students in the greater Philadelphia region.

Registration is required and space is limited, so I hope you will register today.

Anthony Stanowski
President and CEO
CAHME

CAHME Boot Camp Will Get You in Shape for Accreditation

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE

The CAHME Boot Camp is a great opportunity to get the latest on CAHME accreditation standards and details on the accreditation process. It’s considered a “must attend” event for programs at all stages of the accreditation process.

This year’s Boot Camp will focus on new competency-based education standards that were introduced in 2017. We revamped the curriculum to better align with the needs of programs approaching first-time accreditation, programs going for re-accreditation, and those that need a refresher on accreditation standards. The session is highly interactive, focusing on technical instructions and hands-on practice. You will leave knowing more and being better prepared!

Dan Gentry presenting at last year’s CAHME Boot Camp.

I am grateful for our outstanding Boot Camp instructors, Daniel Gentry, PhD, MHA, clinical professor and MHA program director from the Department of Health Management and Policy at the University of Iowa College of Public Health and Kevin D. Broom, PhD, associate professor of health policy and management, and director the MHA and MHA/MBA programs at the Graduate School of Public Health at the University of Pittsburgh. Daniel and Kevin are deeply knowledgeable about accreditation and will help you fully understand the new criteria and how programs can best comply.

The Boot Camp will be held on Sunday, March 25 in Chicago, at 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, right before ACHE Congress that begins the next day. A ticket to the Boot Camp includes admission to the special CAHME Awards luncheon, where attendees will learn how five programs have advanced graduate healthcare management education.

I encourage you not to miss the Boot Camp. Registering today will ensure you get your spot.  Space is limited, and only a handful of openings remain.

Anthony Stanowski, DHA, FACHE
President & CEO
CAHME